Worth it or Woke?
Worth it or Woke?

Worth it or Woke?

@worthitorwoke

Land of Bad
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Land of Bad

The history of military drones dates back to the early 1900s. During World War I‚ unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) were used for reconnaissance missions. These early drones were primarily balloons equipped with cameras. However‚ it wasn’t until World War II that more sophisticated drone systems emerged. These drones served as targets for training and were also used for intelligence gathering. In recent years‚ armed UAVs like the MQ-1 Predator have played a crucial role in military operations‚ including combat missions in Afghanistan and Iraq. Land of Bad shows audiences how far they’ve come. Land of Bad When his Spec Ops team is ambushed‚ Air Force Sergeant JJ Kinney’s only hope of survival lies with drone pilots thousands of miles away to guide them through 48 hours of hell. Falling somewhere between SISU’s relentless and over-the-top action and Guy Ritchie’s The Covenanent’s grounded depiction of combat‚ Land of Bad is a surprisingly engaging action war thriller. It may not add much new to the genre‚ but it manages to deliver what genre fans want: compelling and realistic men depicting visceral heroism while unironically exploring universal themes of duty and survival under impossible conditions. Its limited cast does its duty by giving equally natural performances that expertly hook the audience and provide them with a raw connection to the film’s stakes. Hemsworth‚ who gets the lion’s share of the film’s focus‚ proves that he has what it takes to be a serious action star. Were it not for every other aspect of the show‚ his turn as Sergeant Kinney would be more than enough to give Witcher fans hope. Admittedly‚ though‚ there are one or two very brief moments in which his intensity isn’t quite commensurate with the scene. The rest of the cast is brimming with enough charisma to work quickly within the constraints of their relatively brief screen time to infuse a richness to their characters that lesser performers would have missed. This is especially true for the once-svelte star of Gladiator‚ Russell Crowe. Crowe proves that his talent is as expansive as his waistline by infusing a character that could have just as easily been completely omitted with heart and purpose. He delivers a magnetic performance for an otherwise cutting room floor subplot. Land of Bad isn’t a perfect movie. Its plot has been recycled from countless other films‚ and it overlooks some basic details (especially toward the end). Still‚ for those few things it gets wrong‚ it more than makes up for with its primal stakes‚ perfect pacing‚ and some first-rate cinematography. It’s been a while since I left the cinema with a smile on my face. I’m happy to mark Land of Bad as Worth it. Role Models The self-sacrificing‚ no-quit‚ complete-the-mission attitude that exemplifies the best of U.S. soldiers is on full display and honors those who have sacrificed much for more.   WOKE ELEMENTS None. The post Land of Bad first appeared on Worth It or Woke.

Avatar: The Last Airbender
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Avatar: The Last Airbender

In recent years‚ Hollywood has increasingly turned its attention to beloved anime series‚ attempting to bring these vibrant worlds and characters to life on the big screen. Netflix’s “One Piece” managed to capture the spirit of the original while introducing fresh elements‚ resonating with audiences and proving that a faithful remake could indeed succeed. Meanwhile‚ the Netflix-produced “Avatar: The Last Airbender” has generated immense anticipation. Fans have eagerly awaited the adaptation‚ hoping it too will… This content is for members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.The post Avatar: The Last Airbender first appeared on Worth It or Woke.

Tenet
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Tenet

“A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court” (1921)‚ directed by Emmett J. Flynn‚ stands as one of the earliest explorations of time travel in cinema. Adapted from Mark Twain’s classic novel‚ the film follows a modern-day mechanic who inexplicably finds himself thrust back into the medieval realm of King Arthur. This pioneering portrayal of temporal displacement laid the groundwork for the genre’s evolution on the silver screen. Nearly a century later‚ Christopher Nolan’s mind-bending “Tenet” (2020) would further redefine the complexities and intricacies of time manipulation in film‚ showcasing humanity’s enduring fascination with altering the course of history. Tenet A super spy‚ played by John David Washington‚ is recruited into a world of danger and intrigue on a temporal scale. Working almost entirely in the dark‚ he will have to fight his way to the top of a criminal organization wrapped in mystery. The price of his failure? All of existence. Originally released 6 months into the COVID scare in the hopes of bringing people back to the cinema‚ many criticisms have been laid at the feet of Tenet. Chief among them is that it doesn’t make any sense‚ which isn’t helped by director Christopher Nolan’s recent admission that Tenet isn’t supposed to make sense. In the interview‚ Nolan says that he wants viewers to “experience” his films and that they aren’t puzzles to be solved. This is all well and good. Ambiguity can be an effective narrative tool. Just look at another of Nolan’s films‚ Inception. More than 13 years after its release‚ people are still arguing over its ending. However‚ for all that Tenet gets right‚ which is gone into some detail below‚ it misses a key ingredient that helped to make Inception’s spinning top thought-provoking instead of frustrating. That is a visceral connection to the characters and action. In Tenet‚ you root for the protagonist because you’re supposed to. In Inception‚ the audience roots for DiCapprio’s Cobb because they want to. So‚ what does Tenet get right? As per the norm‚ Christopher Nolan surrounds himself with the best people. His visual crew‚ including the cinematographer and production designer‚ concists of familiar names from his past films‚ and the actors whom he cast are always perfect for their roles. John David Washington exudes an immediate presence and swagger as well as a sincerity as The Protagonist that helps to carry his character through some of the film’s more unfortunate and repetitive exposition dumps. One day‚ he will find the right role for him that will be a worthy showcase of his talent (on a side note‚ I’d love to see a buddy action film starring him and Henry Cavill. Both are charming and charismatic actors who do action right but have never really found their place in Hollywood – The Witcher mess not withstanding.). The supporting cast is also strong‚ with Robert Pattinson showing once again that he’s more than just a sparkling vampire for whom tween girls salivate. Unfortunately‚ the audience is never given much of a reason to care about his character. Oh‚ sure‚ at the film’s conclusion‚ there’s a bit of a twist revealed that‚ if explored earlier‚ had the potential to engender empathy for the two men. However‚ it’s far too little‚ far too late. After the debacle that was the Star Wars prequels‚ it was revealed that George Lucas believed that audiences “didn’t care” about the story; they only wanted mind-blowing visuals. While Nolan certainly doesn’t seem to ascribe to the same filmmaking philosophy‚ Tenet suffers from exactly this‚ nonetheless. The interpersonal relationships are sacrificed on the altar of thoughtfully intricate and thought-provoking story mechanics. In the second act‚ a character is introduced whose primary purpose is to provide the audience with some human connection and a reason to care about the impending apocalypse. Regrettably‚ both her character and the B-plot surrounding her feel tacked on and artificial. Were the main protagonists compelling enough to cultivate that needed connection on their own‚ the stakes would have been sufficient to engage the audience on a deeper level‚ and the film would have provided a much richer experience. Sadly‚ while character development might be Tenet’s greatest weakness‚ it’s not its only weakness. Even though Nolan claims that audiences aren’t supposed to understand the film completely‚ Tenet is no stranger to dialogue-heavy scenes that spend 70% of the film trying to (sometimes clunkily) explain what’s going on. Nolan is usually a master at pacing; however‚ Tenet is plagued by an abundance of these heavy exposition dumps that completely arrest the film’s momentum. Tenet’s Visuals Tenet is a quintessential Nolan visual experience that‚ despite its deceptively mundane plot and significant narrative deficiencies‚ is an underrated technical achievement. The thought and care that must have gone into coordinating the film’s effects while maintaining continuity can’t be overemphasized. The storyboarding likely sent at least one artist to the insane asylum. For this reason‚ and the fact that your only other choices are the indecipherable Bob Marley: One Love and the cinematic roadkill that is Drive-Away Dolls‚ we’re unofficially recommending Tenet as Worth it for this weekend’s limited re-release‚ but only under the condition that you see it in IMAX.   WOKE ELEMENTS I Don’t Need No Man One of the tertiary characters is secretly in charge of her organization and uses her husband as a front. Fine‚ obviously‚ women can be capable bosses. What’s woke about this is that the filmmakers actively make her subterfuge about misogyny. She dismissively tells her husband‚ “Sanje‚ make a drink for our guest‚ please.” It’s done in such a way that were the roles reversed‚ feminists would be crying foul. In the very next scene‚ she tells Washington’s character‚ “A masculine front in a man’s world has its uses.” How Dare You It’s one line that is saved for the end of the film‚ but the entire movie exists because ***SPOILER ALERT*** Global Warming ruined the future. ***END SPOILER***  The post Tenet first appeared on Worth It or Woke.

I Woke Up A Vampire
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I Woke Up A Vampire

Vampires have fascinated audiences for centuries. Their origins can be traced back to the 18th century when they emerged in poetry and gradually became iconic figures in gothic fiction. Notable works include John William Polidori’s novella “The Vampyre‚” which introduced the aristocratic vampire archetype. Then there is Bram Stoker’s masterpiece‚ “Dracula‚” which solidified the vampire mythos with Count Dracula as the quintessential vampire. In a more contemporary twist‚ the Netflix series “I Woke Up A… This content is for members only. Visit the site and log in/register to read.The post I Woke Up A Vampire first appeared on Worth It or Woke.

Drive-Away Dolls
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Drive-Away Dolls

Drive-Away Dolls marks Ethan Coen’s first solo feature film. Born in Minnesota‚ together the Coen brothers have crafted a diverse and critically acclaimed body of work since their debut feature‚ “Blood Simple‚” in 1984. With a unique blend of dark humor‚ sharp dialogue‚ and a penchant for exploring the eccentricities of human nature‚ the Coen Brothers have left an indelible mark on cinema. Their filmography includes iconic works such as “Fargo‚” “The Big Lebowski‚” and “No Country for Old Men‚” which earned them Academy Awards for Best Director and Best Picture. The Coen Brothers consistently challenge cinematic conventions‚ creating a legacy that reflects their artistic innovation and narrative prowess in the world of filmmaking. Drive-Away Dolls When Jamie’s girlfriend throws her out for cheating‚ Jamie and her mousey friend Marian decide to go on a road trip to Tallahassee for a fresh start. Too bad for them that they took the way wrong car. Now‚ the two will have to deal not only with Jamie’s complete lack of self-awareness and inhibition but also with the mysterious and violent men bent on retrieving some very special packages hidden in the ladies’ vehicle. If you were ever curious which of the Coen Brothers was the talented one‚ Drive-Away Dolls doesn’t help Ethan Coen’s case. Dolls is a slow-paced slog that inexpertly moves from one scene to the next as its two leads babble banal dialogue that vacillates between humorless attempts at humor and shallow attempts at depth; all brought together with underdeveloped supporting characters and a plot that had to have been conceived of while stoned. Andie MacDowell’s daughter‚ Margaret Qualley‚ plays Jaime‚ the free-spirited lesbian with a sex drive as over the top as her cartoonish southern accent and hammy performance. It’s a testament to the difference good material and a quality director with vision make when comparing Qualley in this embarrassment to her turn as Pussycat in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon A Time… In Hollywood. It’s not that Qualley is bad so much as her character‚ much like the rest of the film‚ is poorly written with a meaningless point of view that writers Ethan Coen and Tricia Cooke manually churn like butter into every line of dialogue as they fumble from one scene to the next. The rest of the cast doesn’t fare much better. The villains are underdeveloped goons with no chemistry and so little screentime as to easily be forgotten between scenes‚ and there are coffee mugs more interesting than the character arc of Qualley’s costar Geraldine Viswanathan’s‚ Marian. In a film this bad‚ it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly where Drive-Away Dolls fails hardest. However‚ it lacks the polish that’s synonymous with Coen Brother’s films. Instead‚ it feels like a half-baked‚ underdeveloped attempt at making a lesbian propaganda film in a poor approximation of a Coen Brothers’ film. It’s far more interested in extolling the wonders of sapphic love than it is with storytelling and spends large chunks of time its 1h 24m runtime doesn’t have devoted to overlong and sometimes graphic lesbian sex scenes (not the hot kind) while ignoring things like plot and character development or quality dialogue‚ or even style. Ultimately‚ Drive-Away Dolls is an embarrassingly bad film that will likely be praised for its “bravery” but is better left unwatched and forgotten. If this is the best that Ethan Coen has to offer‚ he should hold onto his brother’s coattails like grim death.   WOKE ELEMENTS Drive-Away Dolls is a 1h 24m LGBTQRSTUV celebration barely couched in the trappings of a film. The post Drive-Away Dolls first appeared on Worth It or Woke.