The 4th Of July

With the Fourth of July, citizens remember the country's founding in their own individual ways. What makes it special though, is that we never forget. As a nation, it's important that we take to heart what our Founding Fathers hoped for, for this country and what her citizens h

Celebrated on the fourth day of July each year, Independence Day commemorates the United States' adoption of the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. The famed document declared independence from England.

From the start, this summer holiday has been one of the country's most popular. On this day, it seems that everyone feels a sense of patriotic pride. It's a day for family and friends, with unity found at all levels of community. National pride is on full display with every fireworks show, picnic, and barbecue.

Written by Thomas Jefferson, the Declaration of Independence is considered the founding document of the nation. Known as both the Fourth of July and Independence Day, the holiday is one that celebrates the "birth" of these United States and suitably, its citizens throw her a party each year.

A few milestones in the history of the holiday include:

o 1783: The day becomes a holiday in some parts of the country, such as Boston.

o 1791: The first time "Independence Day" is used in reference to the day.

o 1870: The day is declared an unpaid holiday for federal employees.

o 1941: The day is revised to be a paid holiday for federal employees.

o 1976: Its Bicentennial.

In 1777, Philadelphia (home of the Liberty Bell) took it upon itself to remember the day. Minor celebrations were held, such as bell-ringing and fired guns, but the War of Independence was still being waged. When the war ended however, this tradition would continue on and only expand with time to be the huge fests that we see today.

Traditions associated with the Fourth of July include fireworks of course, as well as picnics, barbecues, and baseball. Many Americans choose to display their patriotic pride by wearing flag pins, T-shirts, and hats that represent the Stars and Stripes, our national symbols, and official colors.

John Adams, the nation's second president, was a major proponent of recognizing the day. In a letter to his wife Abigail, Adams famously wrote:

"I believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival... It ought to be celebrated by pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires, and illuminations from one end of this continent to the other."

And so the nation listened. The Fourth of July has in a sense, turned into a huge party across the states. Just as Adams foresaw. Blockbuster movies are released this weekend, as well as sales bonanzas from every store. Americans go out and celebrate in a variety of ways, including outdoor concerts, road trips, and shopping sprees.

With the Fourth of July, citizens remember the country's founding in their own individual ways. What makes it special though, is that we never forget. As a nation, it's important that we take to heart what our Founding Fathers hoped for, for this country and what her citizens have done over time to ensure that each person enjoys those rights.



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